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(c) 2011, Brenda Grantland, Esq., updated 4/18/2011

Copyright notice:  This article and the videos linked below may be linked to, emailed, printed, and/or disseminated to others so long as it is done free of charge, and the article or video is disseminated in its entirety and without changes to the text or video composition, and the copyright notice is included.  However, they may not be republished for sale, either by themselves or as part of a compilation of other material, without written permission from the author. 



Asset Forfeiture:  How to File A Claim

The following video explains how to prepare and file a claim in a federal forfeiture case, featuring an excerpt from FEAR's continuing legal education video, Forfeiture 101, a two-hour crash course in federal forfeiture law and procedure.  This web video excerpt contains only the basic first steps of filing a claim.  Forfeiture procedures are very complex, and the steps described in this web video are only the first steps.  If you are defending a forfeiture case for the first time, this video is a start, but you also need to do some research to educate yourself about the forfeiture laws and procedures applicable to your case.  The FEAR Law Library, on the website of Forfeiture Endangers American Rights Foundation, www.fear.org, provides free links to the federal and state forfeiture statutes. You can also purchase the Forfeiture 101 DVD and FEAR's Asset Forfeiture Defense Manual, as well as a subscription to the FEAR Brief Bank on the FEAR website.  These low cost materials will save you many hours of research, and prevent the costly mistakes frequently made by lawyers who try to wing it through forfeiture's treacherous maze of procedures for the first time.

This video describes the claims procedure under federal law.  If your case is a state case, the procedures will vary.  Consult the FEAR law library for the statutes for your state.



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